Redland City Council tackles IT outages with modular data centre

Goal to reduce weather-related outages, increase energy efficiency, and maintain services.

By Jennifer O'Brien
June 5, 2017


(Front: L to R: Glynn Henderson, Redland City Council; William Osborne, Resolute IT. Back: L to R: Andrew Chase, Philips Lighting; Robert Linsdell, Vertiv; Ian Dempsey,, Resolute IT; Tony Pantano, Vertiv; Daniel Sargent, Vertiv)
[Front left to right] Glynn Henderson, Redland City Council; William Osborne, Resolute IT. [Back left to right] Andrew Chase, Philips Lighting; Robert Linsdell, Vertiv; Ian Dempsey,, Resolute IT; Tony Pantano, Vertiv; Daniel Sargent, Vertiv. 

Weather-related outages can leave Queensland's Redland City Council's 150,000 residents unable to access services such as utilities, animal management and libraries.

That's one of the reasons why the council's IT team decided to adopt a Vertiv (formerly Emerson Network Power) modular data centre, which will help "boost resiliency and lower costs," CIO Glynn Henderson, told CIO Australia.

Redland City Council is the local government authority for the Redlands, which includes the Southern Moreton Bay Islands, North Stradbroke Island and the mainland from Redland Bay in the south, to Capalaba in the west and Thorneside to the north.

Henderson said the technology will be implemented in a purpose-built facility elevated to put it out of harm's way from weather events, which typically cause IT outages once or twice per year in the region.  

He said the technology is expected to reduce the risk of weather-related outages, increase energy efficiency and gain higher performance across the IT environment. The implementation will take place in June.

"We provide municipal services to 150,000 residents. So we need to have our services available all of the time, ready and enabled to service our people and service our community.

CIO Glynn Henderson
CIO Glynn Henderson

"It's about resiliency and ensuring no matter what happens with the weather or with the services to our sites, that our critical ICT infrastructure continues to function and provide those services to the community," he said.

Henderson said the move to adopt the containerised modular data centre will also free up between 150-200 sqm of space within the council previously taken up by its legacy data centres, allowing it to create more open work spaces and bring teams within the council closer together.

Council will also reduce its carbon footprint and save costs with the move. He said the new datacentre will save up to 40 per cent in electricity costs, which will be bolstered further by solar panels that will be fitted to the facility housing the data centre in the future.

The technology implementation will be completed by Resolute IT, a subsidiary of the Queensland Government and is a step in the right direction towards council's vision of delivering a 'smart city' agenda. 

"We're capitalising as much as we can from this move," Henderson said. "Outsourcing the management of our data centre will enable our team to start focusing on smart city initiatives, which is something we're building towards."

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